White Paper: The New gTLDs - Security by Design

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Abstract

At the end of June 2012 there were more than 240 million domains registered across all Top- Level Domains (TLDs). Just a generation ago global connectivity on this scale seemed an unlikely achievement. Once-unfamiliar technologies are now embraced, absorbed and integrated into everyday life, and even seem commonplace in some of the remotest places on earth.

The domain industry has flourished in this time and yet remains an enterprise in its infancy. Changes to the Internet naming structure in 2013 provide an opportune juncture at which to map out a model for the future that meets the diverse needs of the industry.

Cybercriminal activity on the web reminds us that there are many obstacles to further industry growth. The rollout of the new gTLDs provides the opportunity for consensus on the approach to this challenge and much-needed standardization of procedures across the industry. As well, it provides the opportunity for new gTLDs to demonstrate a commitment to online security; with the immediate financial incentive of dramatically-reduced abuse costs. The result will be a trusted environment with minimal risk associated, which in itself will create the potential for real growth.

Registries can take the lead in demonstrating a commitment to online security and engender confidence and trust from the top down as the new gTLDs program begins to unfold.

This white paper looks at the current problems presented by domain abuse, what the new gTLD program is doing to address these issues and what other proactive measures can be taken by the industry.

Authors

Editor Jart Armin
Contributors Dr Bob Bruen
Steve Burn
Andrew Fields
Will Rogofsky
Bryn Thompson
Reviewers Raoul Chiesa
Rod Rasmussen
Garth Bruen
Peter Kruse
Alexander Klimberg
Andrey Komarov

Feedback

We welcome any feedback relating to this white paper, and anticipate releasing new research on the topic of new gTLDs in 2013.

Get in touch.